The Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the United States of America Part 14

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[43] _Statutes at Large_, II. 70.

[44] _Annals of Cong._, 7 Cong. 2 sess. pp. 385-6.

[45] _Ibid._, p. 424.

[46] See House Bills Nos. 89 and 101; _Annals of Cong._, 7 Cong. 2 sess. pp. 424, 459-67. For the debate, see _Ibid._, pp. 459-72.

[47] _Statutes at Large_, II. 205.

[48] Cf. Fowler, _Local Law in Ma.s.sachusetts and Connecticut_, etc., p. 126.

[49] Speech of S.L. Mitch.e.l.l of New York, Feb. 14, 1804: _Annals of Cong._, 8 Cong. 1 sess. p. 1000. Cf. also speech of Bedinger: _Ibid._, pp. 997-8.

[50] Speech of Lowndes in the House, Feb. 14, 1804: _Annals of Cong._, 8 Cong., 1 sess. p. 992. Cf. Stanton’s speech later: _Ibid._, 9 Cong. 2 sess. p. 240.

[51] _Annals of Cong._, 8 Cong. 1 sess. pp. 820, 876.

[52] _Ibid._, pp. 992-1036.

[53] Huger of South Carolina declared that the whole South Carolina Congressional delegation opposed the repeal of the law, although they maintained the State’s right to do so if she chose: _Annals of Cong._, 8 Cong. 1 sess. p. 1005.

[54] _Ibid._, pp. 1020-36; _House Journal_ (repr. 1826), 8 Cong. 1 sess. IV 523, 578, 580, 581-5.

[55] On slavery in the Territories, cf. Welling, in _Report Amer. Hist. a.s.soc._, 1891, pp. 133-60.

[56] _Statutes at Large_, I. 108.

[57] _Journals of Cong._, XII. 137-8.

[58] _Annals of Cong._, 5 Cong. 1 sess. pp. 511, 515, 532-3.

[59] _Ibid._, 5 Cong. 2 sess. pp. 1235, 1249, 1277-84, 1296-1313.

[60] _Annals of Cong._, 5 Cong. 2 sess. p. 1313.

[61] _Statutes at Large_, I. 549.

[62] _Amer. State Papers, Miscellaneous_, I. No. 177.

[63] _Annals of Cong._, 8 Cong. 1 sess. pp. 106, 211, 223, 231, 233-4, 238.

[64] _Ibid._, pp. 240, 1186.

[65] _Ibid._, p. 241.

[66] _Ibid._, p. 240.

[67] _Ibid._, p. 242.

[68] For further proceedings, see _Annals of Cong._, 8 Cong. 1 sess. pp. 240-55, 1038-79, 1128-9, 1185-9. For the law, see _Statutes at Large_, II. 283-9.

[69] First, a bill was introduced applying the Northwest Ordinance to the Territory (_Annals of Cong._, 8 Cong. 2 sess.

pp. 45-6); but this was replaced by a Senate bill (_Ibid._, p.

68; _Senate Journal_, repr. 1821, 8 Cong. 2 sess. III. 464).

For the pet.i.tion of the inhabitants, see _Annals of Cong._, 8 Cong. 2 sess. p. 727-8.

[70] The bill was hurried through, and there are no records of debate. Cf. _Annals of Cong._, 8 Cong. 2 sess. pp. 28-69, 727, 871, 957, 1016-20, 1213-5. In _Senate Journal_ (repr. 1821), III., see Index, Bill No. 8. Importation of slaves was allowed by a clause erecting a Frame of Government “similar” to that of the Mississippi Territory.

[71] _Annals of Cong._, 9 Cong. 1 sess. p. 443. The whole trade was practically foreign, for the slavers merely entered the Negroes at Charleston and immediately reshipped them to New Orleans. Cf. _Annals of Cong._, 16 Cong. 1 sess. p. 264.

[72] _House Journal_ (repr. 1826), 9 Cong. 1 sess. V. 264; _Annals of Cong._, 9 Cong. 1 sess. pp. 445, 878.

[73] _House Reports_, 9 Cong. 1 sess. Feb. 17, 1806.

[74] House Bill No. 123.

[75] _Annals of Cong._, 16 Cong. 2 sess. pp. 73-7. This report covers the time from Jan. 1, 1804, to Dec. 31, 1807. During that time the following was the number of ships engaged in the traffic:–

From Charleston, 61 From Connecticut, 1 ” Rhode Island, 59 ” Sweden, 1 ” Baltimore, 4 ” Great Britain, 70 ” Boston, 1 ” France, 3 ” Norfolk, 2 202

The consignees of these slave ships were natives of Charleston 13 Rhode Island 88 Great Britain 91 France 10 —- 202

The following slaves were imported:– By British vessels 19,949 ” French ” 1,078 —— 21,027

By American vessels:– ” Charleston merchants 2,006 ” Rhode Island ” 7,958 ” Foreign ” 5,717 ” other Northern ” 930 ” ” Southern ” 1,437 18,048 —— ——

Total number of slaves imported, 1804-7 39,075

It is, of course, highly probable that the Custom House returns were much below the actual figures.

[76] McMaster, _History of the People of the United States_, III. p. 517.

[77] _House Journal_ (repr. 1826), 8 Cong. 2 sess. V. 171; _Ma.s.s. Resolves_, May, 1802, to March, 1806, Vol. II. A.

(State House ed., p. 239).

[78] _House Journal_ (repr. 1826), 9 Cong. 1 sess. V. 238.

[79] _Ibid._, V. 266.

[80] _Senate Journal_ (repr. 1821), 9 Cong. 1 sess. IV. 76, 77, 79.

[81] _House Journal_ (repr. 1826), 8 Cong. 2 sess. V. 171.

[82] _Annals of Cong._, 9 Cong. 1 sess. p. 274.

[83] _Ibid._, pp. 272-4, 323.

[84] _Ibid._, pp. 346-52, 358-75, etc., to 520.

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