The Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the United States of America Part 47

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Right of Search granted for the suppression of the slave-trade. _British and Foreign State Papers_, 1824-5, pp. 3-28.]

~1824, Nov. 6. Great Britain: Counter Project of 1825.~

Great Britain proposes to conclude the treaty as amended by the Senate, if the word “America” is reinstated in Art. I. (Cf. above, March 13, 1824.) February 16, 1825, the House Committee favors this project; March 2, Addington reminds Adams of this counter proposal; April 6, Clay refuses to reopen negotiations on account of the failure of the Colombian treaty. _Amer. State Papers, Foreign_, V. 367; _House Reports_, 18 Cong. 2 sess. I. No. 70; _House Doc._, 19 Cong. 1 sess. I.

No. 16.

~1824, Dec. 7. President Monroe’s Message.~

“It is a cause of serious regret, that no arrangement has yet been finally concluded between the two Governments, to secure, by joint co-operation, the suppression of the slave trade. It was the object of the British Government, in the early stages of the negotiation, to adopt a plan for the suppression, which should include the concession of the mutual right of search by the ships of war of each party, of the vessels of the other, for suspected offenders. This was objected to by this Government, on the principle that, as the right of search was a right of war of a belligerant towards a neutral power, it might have an ill effect to extend it, by treaty, to an offence which had been made comparatively mild, to a time of peace. Anxious, however, for the suppression of this trade, it was thought adviseable, in compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives, founded on an act of Congress, to propose to the British Government an expedient, which should be free from that objection, and more effectual for the object, by making it piratical…. A convention to this effect was concluded and signed, in London,” on the 13th of March, 1824, “by plenipotentiaries duly authorized by both Governments, to the ratification of which certain obstacles have arisen, which are not yet entirely removed.” [For the removal of which, the doc.u.ments relating to the negotiation are submitted for the action of Congress]….

“In execution of the laws for the suppression of the slave trade, a vessel has been occasionally sent from that squadron to the coast of Africa, with orders to return thence by the usual track of the slave ships, and to seize any of our vessels which might be engaged in that trade. None have been found, and, it is believed, that none are thus employed. It is well known, however, that the trade still exists under other flags.” _House Journal_, 18 Cong. 2 sess. pp. 11, 12, 19, 27, 241; _House Reports_, 18 Cong. 2 sess. I. No. 70; Gales and Seaton, _Register of Debates_, I. 625-8, and Appendix, p. 2 ff.

~1825, Feb. 21. United States of Colombia: Proposed Treaty.~

The President sends to the Senate a treaty with the United States of Colombia drawn, as United States Minister Anderson said, similar to that signed at London, with the alterations made by the Senate. March 9, 1825, the Senate rejects this treaty. _Amer. State Papers, Foreign_, V.

729-35.

~1825, Feb. 28. Congress (House): Proposed Resolution on Slave-Trade.~

Mr. Mercer laid on the table the following resolution:–

“_Resolved_, That the President of the United States be requested to enter upon, and prosecute from time to time, such negotiations with the several maritime powers of Europe and America, as he may deem expedient for the effectual abolition of the slave trade, and its ultimate denunciation, as piracy, under the law of nations, by the consent of the civilized world.” The House refused to consider the resolution. _House Journal_, 18 Cong. 2 sess. p. 280; Gales and Seaton, _Register of Debates_, I. 697, 736.

~1825, March 3. Congress (House): Proposed Resolution against Right of Search.~

“Mr. Forsyth submitted the following resolution:

“_Resolved_, That while this House anxiously desires that the Slave Trade should be, universally, denounced as Piracy, and, as such, should be detected and punished under the law of nations, it considers that it would be highly inexpedient to enter into engagements with any foreign power, by which _all_ the merchant vessels of the United States would be exposed to the inconveniences of any regulation of search, from which any merchant vessels of that foreign power would be exempted.”

Resolution laid on the table. _House Journal_, 18 Cong. 2 sess. pp.

308-9; Gales and Seaton, _Register of Debates_, I. 739.

~1825, Dec. 6. President Adams’s Message.~

“The objects of the West India Squadron have been, to carry into execution the laws for the suppression of the African Slave Trade: for the protection of our commerce against vessels of piratical character…. These objects, during the present year, have been accomplished more effectually than at any former period. The African Slave Trade has long been excluded from the use of our flag; and if some few citizens of our country have continued to set the laws of the Union, as well as those of nature and humanity, at defiance, by persevering in that abominable traffic, it has been only by sheltering themselves under the banners of other nations, less earnest for the total extinction of the trade than ours.” _House Journal_, 19 Cong. 1 sess. pp. 20, 96, 296-7, 305, 323, 329, 394-5, 399, 410, 414, 421, 451, 640.

~1826, Feb. 14. Congress (House): Proposition to Repeal Parts of Act of 1819.~

“Mr. Forsyth submitted the following resolutions, viz.:

1. “_Resolved_, That it is expedient to repeal so much of the act of the 3d March, 1819, ent.i.tled, ‘An act in addition to the acts prohibiting the slave trade,’ as provides for the appointment of agents on the coast of Africa.

2. “_Resolved_, That it is expedient so to modify the said act of the 3d of March, 1819, as to release the United States from all obligation to support the negroes already removed to the coast of Africa, and to provide for such a disposition of those taken in slave ships who now are in, or who may be, hereafter, brought into the United States, as shall secure to them a fair opportunity of obtaining a comfortable subsistence, without any aid from the public treasury.” Read and laid on the table. _Ibid._, p. 258.

~1826, March 14. United States Statute: Appropriation.~

“An Act making appropriations for the support of the navy,” etc.

“For the agency on the coast of Africa, for receiving the negroes,”

etc., $32,000. _Statutes at Large_, IV. 140, 141.

~1827, March 2. United States Statute: Appropriation.~

“An Act making appropriations for the support of the Navy,” etc.

“For the agency on the coast of Africa,” etc., $56,710. _Ibid._, W. 206, 208.

~1827, March 11. Texas: Introduction of Slaves Prohibited.~

Const.i.tution of the State of Coahuila and Texas. Preliminary Provisions:–

Art. 13. “From and after the promulgation of the const.i.tution in the capital of each district, no one shall be born a slave in the state, and after six months the introduction of slaves under any pretext shall not be permitted.” _Laws and Decrees of Coahuila and Texas_ (Houston, 1839), p. 314.

~1827, Sept. 15. Texas: Decree against Slave-Trade.~

“The Congress of the State of Coahuila and Texas decrees as follows:”

Art. 1. All slaves to be registered.

Art. 2, 3. Births and deaths to be recorded.

Art. 4. “Those who introduce slaves, after the expiration of the term specified in article 13 of the Const.i.tution, shall be subject to the penalties established by the general law of the 13th of July, 1824.”

_Ibid._, pp. 78-9.

~1828, Feb. 25. Congress (House): Proposed Bill to Abolish African Agency, etc.~

“Mr. McDuffie, from the Committee of Ways and Means, … reported the following bill:

“A bill to abolish the Agency of the United States on the Coast of Africa, to provide other means of carrying into effect the laws prohibiting the slave trade, and for other purposes.” This bill was amended so as to become the act of May 24, 1828 (see below). _House Reports_, 21 Cong. 1 sess. III. No. 348, p. 278.

~1828, May 24. United States Statute: Appropriation.~

“An Act making an appropriation for the suppression of the slave trade.”

_Statutes at Large_, IV. 302; _House Journal_, 20 Cong. 1 sess., House Bill No. 190.

~1829, Jan. 28. Congress (House): Bill to Amend Act of 1807.~

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