The Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the United States of America Part 48

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The Committee on Commerce reported “a bill (No. 399) to amend an act, ent.i.tled ‘An act to prohibit the importation of slaves,'” etc. Referred to Committee of the Whole. _House Journal_, 20 Cong. 2 sess. pp. 58, 84, 215. Cf. _Ibid._, 20 Cong. 1 sess. pp. 121, 135.

~1829, March 2. United States Statute: Appropriation.~

“An Act making additional appropriations for the support of the navy,”

etc.

“For the reimburs.e.m.e.nt of the marshal of Florida for expenses incurred in the case of certain Africans who were wrecked on the coast of the United States, and for the expense of exporting them to Africa,”

$16,000. _Statutes at Large_, IV. 353, 354.

~1830, April 7. Congress (House): Resolution against Slave-Trade.~

Mr. Mercer reported the following resolution:–

“_Resolved_, That the President of the United States be requested to consult and negotiate with all the Governments where Ministers of the United States are, or shall be accredited, on the means of effecting an entire and immediate abolition of the African slave trade; and especially, on the expediency, with that view, of causing it to be universally denounced as piratical.” Referred to Committee of the Whole; no further action recorded. _House Journal_, 21 Cong. 1 sess. p. 512.

~1830, April 7. Congress (House): Proposition to Amend Act of March 3, 1819.~

Mr. Mercer, from the committee to which was referred the memorial of the American Colonization Society, and also memorials, from the inhabitants of Kentucky and Ohio, reported with a bill (No. 412) to amend “An act in addition to the acts prohibiting the slave trade,” pa.s.sed March 3, 1819.

Read twice and referred to Committee of the Whole. _Ibid._

~1830, May 31. Congress (Statute): Appropriation.~

“An Act making a re-appropriation of a sum heretofore appropriated for the suppression of the slave trade.” _Statutes at Large_, IV. 425; _Senate Journal_, 21 Cong. 1 sess. pp. 359, 360, 383; _House Journal_, 21 Cong. 1 sess. pp. 624, 808-11.

~1830. [Brazil: Prohibition of Slave-Trade.~

Slave-trade prohibited under severe penalties.]

~1831, 1833. [Great Britain and France: Treaty Granting Right of Search.~

Convention between Great Britain and France granting a mutual limited Right of Search on the East and West coasts of Africa, and on the coasts of the West Indies and Brazil. _British and Foreign State Papers_, 1830-1, p. 641 ff; 1832-3, p. 286 ff.]

~1831, Feb. 16. Congress (House): Proposed Resolution on Slave-Trade.~

“Mr. Mercer moved to suspend the rule of the House in regard to motions, for the purpose of enabling himself to submit a resolution requesting the Executive to enter into negotiations with the maritime Powers of Europe, to induce them to enact laws declaring the African slave trade piracy, and punishing it as such.” The motion was lost. Gales and Seaton, _Register of Debates_, VII. 726.

~1831, March 2. United States Statute: Appropriation.~

“An Act making appropriations for the naval service,” etc.

“For carrying into effect the acts for the suppression of the slave trade,” etc., $16,000. _Statutes at Large_, IV. 460, 462.

~1831, March 3. Congress (House): Resolution as to Treaties.~

“Mr. Mercer moved to suspend the rule to enable him to submit the following resolution:

“_Resolved_, That the President of the United States be requested to renew, and to prosecute from time to time, such negotiations with the several maritime powers of Europe and America as he may deem expedient for the effectual abolition of the African slave trade, and its ultimate denunciation as piracy, under the laws of nations, by the consent of the civilized world.” The rule was suspended by a vote of 108 to 36, and the resolution pa.s.sed, 118 to 32. _House Journal_, 21 Cong. 2 sess. pp.

426-8.

~1833, Feb. 20. United States Statute: Appropriation.~

“An Act making appropriations for the naval service,” etc.

” … for carrying into effect the acts for the suppression of the slave trade,” etc., $5,000. _Statutes at Large_, IV. 614, 615.

~1833, August. Great Britain and France: Proposed Treaty with the United States.~

British and French ministers simultaneously invited the United States to accede to the Convention just concluded between them for the suppression of the slave-trade. The Secretary of State, Mr. M’Lane, deferred answer until the meeting of Congress, and then postponed negotiations on account of the irritable state of the country on the slave question.

Great Britain had proposed that “A reciprocal right of search … be conceded by the United States, limited as to place, and subject to specified restrictions. It is to be employed only in repressing the Slave Trade, and to be exercised under a written and specific authority, conferred on the Commander of the visiting ship.” In the act of accession, “it will be necessary that the right of search should be extended to the coasts of the United States,” and Great Britain will in turn extend it to the British West Indies. This proposal was finally refused, March 24, 1834, chiefly, as stated, because of the extension of the Right of Search to the coasts of the United States. This part was waived by Great Britain, July 7, 1834. On Sept. 12 the French Minister joined in urging accession. On Oct. 4, 1834, Forsyth states that the determination has “been definitely formed, not to make the United States a party to any Convention on the subject of the Slave Trade.”

_Parliamentary Papers_, 1835, Vol. LI., _Slave Trade_, Cla.s.s B., pp.

84-92.

~1833, Dec. 23. Georgia: Slave-Trade Acts Amended.~

“An Act to reform, amend, and consolidate the penal laws of the State of Georgia.”

13th Division. “Offences relative to Slaves”:–

— 1. “If any person or persons shall bring, import, or introduce into this State, or aid or a.s.sist, or knowingly become concerned or interested, in bringing, importing, or introducing into this State, either by land or by water, or in any manner whatever, any slave or slaves, each and every such person or persons so offending, shall be deemed princ.i.p.als in law, and guilty of a high misdemeanor, and … on conviction, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars each, for each and every slave, … and imprisonment and labor in the penitentiary for any time not less than one year, nor longer than four years.” Residents, however, may bring slaves for their own use, but must register and swear they are not for sale, hire, mortgage, etc.

— 6. Penalty for knowingly receiving such slaves, $500. Slightly amended Dec. 23, 1836, e.g., emigrants were allowed to hire slaves out, etc.; amended Dec. 19, 1849, so as to allow importation of slaves from “any other slave holding State of this Union.” Prince, _Digest_, pp. 619, 653, 812; Cobb, _Digest_, II. 1018.

~1834, Jan. 24. United States Statute: Appropriation.~

“An Act making appropriations for the naval service,” etc.

“For carrying into effect the acts for the suppression of the slave trade,” etc., $5,000. _Statutes at Large_, IV. 670, 671.

~1836, March 17. Texas: African Slave-Trade Prohibited.~

Const.i.tution of the Republic of Texas: General Provisions:–

— 9. All persons of color who were slaves for life before coming to Texas shall remain so. “Congress shall pa.s.s no laws to prohibit emigrants from bringing their slaves into the republic with them, and holding them by the same tenure by which such slaves were held in the United States; … the importation or admission of Africans or negroes into this republic, excepting from the United States of America, is forever prohibited, and declared to be piracy.” _Laws of the Republic of Texas_ (Houston, 1838), I. 19.

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