The Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the United States of America Part 56

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~1820.~ ~General Artigas~ imports twelve slaves into the United States.

_Friends’ View of the African Slave Trade_ (1824), p. 42.

~1821~ (?). ~Dolphin,~ captured by United States officers and sent to Charleston, South Carolina. _Ibid._, pp. 31-2.

~1821.~ ~La Jeune Eugene,~ ~La Daphnee,~ ~La Mathilde,~ and ~L’Elize,~ captured by U.S.S. Alligator; ~La Jeune Eugene~ sent to Boston; the rest escape, and are recaptured under the French flag; the French protest.

_House Reports_, 21 Cong. 1 sess. III. No. 348, p. 187; _Friends’ View of the African Slave Trade_ (1824), pp. 35-41.

~1821.~ ~La Pensee,~ captured with 220 slaves by the U.S.S. Hornet; taken to Louisiana. _House Reports_, 17 Cong. 1 sess. II. No. 92, p. 5; 21 Cong. 1 sess. III. No. 348, p. 186.

~1821.~ ~Esencia~ lands 113 Negroes at Matanzas. _Parliamentary Papers_, 1822, Vol. XXII., _Slave Trade, Further Papers_, III. p. 78.

~1826.~ ~Fell’s Point~ attempts to land Negroes in the United States.

The Negroes were seized. _American State Papers, Naval Affairs_, II. No.

319, p. 751.

~1827, Dec. 20.~ ~Guerrero,~ Spanish slaver, chased by British, cruiser and grounded on Key West, with 561 slaves; a part (121) were landed at Key West, where they were seized by the collector; 250 were seized by the Spanish and taken to Cuba, etc. _House Journal_, 20 Cong. 1 sess. p.

650; _House_ _Reports_, 24 Cong. 1 sess. I. No. 268; 25 Cong. 2 sess.

I. No. 4; _American State Papers, Naval Affairs_, III. No. 370, p. 210; _Niles’s Register_, x.x.xIII. 373.

~1828, March 11.~ ~General Geddes~ brought into St. Augustine for safe keeping 117 slaves, said to have been those taken from the wrecked ~Guerrero~ and landed at Key West (see above, 1827). _House Doc._, 20 Cong. 1 sess. VI. No. 262.

~1828.~ ~Blue-eyed Mary,~ of Baltimore, sold to Spaniards and captured with 405 slaves by a British cruiser. _Niles’s Register_, x.x.xIV. 346.

~1830, June 4.~ ~Fenix,~ with 82 Africans, captured by U.S.S. Grampus, and brought to Pensacola; American built, with Spanish colors. _House Doc._, 21 Cong. 2 sess. III. No. 54; _House Reports_, 24 Cong. 1 sess.

I. No. 223; _Niles’s Register_, x.x.xVIII. 357.

~1831, Jan. 3.~ ~Comet,~ carrying slaves from the District of Columbia to New Orleans, was wrecked on Bahama banks and 164 slaves taken to Na.s.sau, in New Providence, where they were freed. Great Britain finally paid indemnity for these slaves. _Senate Doc._, 24 Cong. 2 sess. II. No.

174; 25 Cong. 3 sess. III. No. 216.

~1834, Feb. 4.~ ~Encomium,~ bound from Charleston, South Carolina, to New Orleans, with 45 slaves, was wrecked near Fish Key, Abaco, and slaves were carried to Na.s.sau and freed. Great Britain eventually paid indemnity for these slaves. _Ibid._

~1835, March.~ ~Enterprise,~ carrying 78 slaves from the District of Columbia to Charleston, was compelled by rough weather to put into the port of Hamilton, West Indies, where the slaves were freed. Great Britain refused to pay for these, because, before they landed, slavery in the West Indies had been abolished. _Ibid._

~1836, Aug.-Sept.~ ~Emanuel,~ ~Dolores,~ ~Anaconda,~ and ~Viper,~ built in the United States, clear from Havana for Africa. _House Doc._, 26 Cong. 2 sess. V. No. 115, pp. 4-6, 221.

~1837.~ —-. Eleven American slavers clear from Havana for Africa.

_Ibid._, p. 221.

~1837.~ ~Washington,~ allowed to proceed to Africa by the American consul at Havana. _Ibid._, pp. 488-90, 715 ff; 27 Cong, 1 sess. No. 34, pp. 18-21.

~1838.~ ~Prova~ spends three months refitting in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina; afterwards captured by the British, with 225 slaves. _Ibid._, pp. 121, 163-6.

~1838.~ —-. Nineteen American slavers clear from Havana for Africa.

_House Doc._, 26 Cong. 2 sess. V. No. 115, p. 221.

~1838-9.~ ~Venus,~ American built, manned partly by Americans, owned by Spaniards. _Ibid._, pp. 20-2, 106, 124-5, 132, 144-5, 330-2, 475-9.

~1839.~ ~Morris Cooper,~ of Philadelphia, lands 485 Negroes in Cuba.

_Niles’s Register_, LVII. 192.

~1839.~ ~Edwin~ and ~George Crooks,~ slavers, boarded by British cruisers. _House Doc._, 26 Cong. 2 sess. V. No. 115, pp. 12-4, 61-4.

~1839.~ ~Eagle,~ ~Clara,~ and ~Wyoming,~ with American and Spanish flags and papers and an American crew, captured by British cruisers, and brought to New York. The United States government declined to interfere in case of the ~Eagle~ and the ~Clara,~ and they were taken to Jamaica.

The ~Wyoming~ was forfeited to the United States. _Ibid._, pp. 92-104, 109, 112, 118-9, 180-4; _Niles’s Register_, LVI. 256; LVII. 128, 208.

~1839.~ ~Florida,~ protected from British cruisers by American papers.

_House Doc._, 26 Cong. 2 sess. V. No. 115, pp. 113-5.

~1839.~ —-. Five American slavers arrive at Havana from Africa, under American flags. _Ibid._, p. 192.

~1839.~ —-. Twenty-three American slavers clear from Havana. _Ibid._, pp. 190-1, 221.

~1839.~ ~Rebecca,~ part Spanish, condemned at Sierra Leone. _House Reports_, 27 Cong. 3 sess. III. No. 283, pp. 649-54, 675-84.

~1839.~ ~Douglas~ and ~Iago,~ American slavers, visited by British cruisers, for which the United States demanded indemnity. _Ibid._, pp.

542-65, 731-55; _Senate Doc._, 29 Cong. 1 sess. VIII. No. 377, pp.

39-45, 107-12, 116-24, 160-1, 181-2.

~1839, April 9.~ ~Susan,~ suspected slaver, boarded by the British.

_House Doc._, 26 Cong. 2 sess. V. No. 115, pp. 34-41.

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